High schoolers save humanity at e-waste challenge in Frederick Maryland

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The zombies were closing in on fifteen high school students, this past Saturday, but they were not defeated, saving all of humanity with their will to win and mind to find “the cure”. Project e-Reboot is a high school tech challenge created by MAGIC (Mid-Atlantic Gigabit Innovation Collaboratory) , sponsored and hosted by data destruction and electronics recycling company, e-End. The students were teams of 3 from across the state of Maryland, who formed to face the unknown challenge that laid ahead. Teams like, “Brogrammers”, “Detemmienaton” and “Free Pizza”, represented the best minds, from those with advanced tech knowledge to some who were simply full of interest in technology with little experience learning about computer technology.

The stage for Project e-Reboot was set in a post apocalyptic world. Teams of 2-3 students were tasked with establishing communication by using a pile of recycled computer parts to create a computer, access the internet and print the needed e-Reboot “rescue” instructions. “The Project e-Reboot Competition was different from other MAGIC events in that students did not have access to outside resources, such as personal cell phones or computers. They had to rely on the knowledge and problem solving skills of their team, rather than relying on the web,” said Amy Rupp, MAGIC’s executive director.

e-End staff were fully engaged and committed to the project. David Pumphrey, e-End’s Marketing Director, came fully equipped with zombie survival gear, including a meal plan of earthworms (pictured above).

 

The IT staff worked very hard to put together the computers and material needed for the event. They diligently built, tested, deconstructed and boxed the kits, also adding components that weren’t compatible, didn’t work or just added a little zombie flavor to the occasion. On the day of the event, e-End IT staffers, Luke LaPenotiere (pictured below) and Victor Segura, served as safeties to ensure the students were not endangering themselves, as electricity was in use. They also provided hints to the teams, which if a hint was requested, cost the team a 15-minute penalty.

 Owner/CEO and President, Arleen and Steve Chafitz, couldn’t help but to join in the fun and education of Maryland’s bright future leaders in cybersecurity. When the opportunity came to partner with MAGIC, they immediately jumped in to create the synergy, ideas and plan for this apocalyptic atmosphere for education.

Owner/CEO and President, Arleen and Steve Chafitz, couldn’t help but to join in the fun and education of Maryland’s bright future leaders in cybersecurity. When the opportunity came to partner with MAGIC, they immediately jumped in to create the synergy, ideas and plan for this apocalyptic atmosphere for education.

Custom trophies were made from repurposed electronic components and presented to the top three place teams of the competition.

 These fantastic design were done by Bill Unger, owner of  Superior Fabrication .

These fantastic design were done by Bill Unger, owner of Superior Fabrication.

In the end, one team rose to first place…

CONGRATULATIONS, Team Detemmienation, the 1st place winners!

 The first place team, Detemmienation, included Alana Koh, Ben Bonen, and Elizabeth Metzler. They are pictured below with Arleen and Steve Chafitz, owner and CEO of e-End.

The first place team, Detemmienation, included Alana Koh, Ben Bonen, and Elizabeth Metzler. They are pictured below with Arleen and Steve Chafitz, owner and CEO of e-End.

As well as, a warm applause and congratulations to the second and third place team.

Thank you to the high school participants, the MAGIC organization and volunteers, and to the e-End staff for making a huge contribution towards the bright future of these wonderful students.

Now enjoy more photos captured of the event…

 Pictures courtesy of MAGIC.

Pictures courtesy of MAGIC.


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Your company can face costly putative class action lawsuits by the unauthorized exposure of data alone

The following steps are a guideline of measures you should take in order to mitigate the risk of a data breach. Keep in mind that the cost to prevent a data breach is far less than the fines and reputation damage from an actual data breach. With these steps you will be able to:

  • See gaps in your policies and procedures for final disposition of non-paper electronic media, if any.

  • Properly evaluate a vendor for removal of your end-of-life electronics.

  • Learn more about government regulations for handling data. 

  • Know the do's and don'ts of electronics disposition.