Md. firm helps to make nation secure

Company works in destruction of information, equipment

By Ed Waters Jr., Frederick News-Post, December 16, 2013

A table at e-End holds jars full of tiny pieces of metal and plastic that were once cellphones, rifles and even body armor. The company, which specializes in destruction of information and equipment, is certified to work with the Department of Defense, Secret Service, Homeland Security, and other agencies, embassies and government contractors.

The company assures that when it is done with the equipment, there is no data or recognizable parts that could be used by an enemy of the United States.

E-End just moved into the new building at 7118 Geoffrey Way in Frederick, which was outfitted to meet its strict security demands. There are cameras and metal detecting equipment, a secure sign-in area, and no visitor goes into the 20,000-squarefoot site without an escort.

Arleen Chafitz is owner and CEO of the company, a certified woman-owned small business, and her husband, Steve, is president.

Many people come into e-End to recycle a computer or other electronic devices, but they may not be aware of the high security involved in the company's activities.

Besides the Chafitzes, there are 15 employees, all of whom have had in-depth security screenings and hold security clearances. Some work is done at the location, and e-End also has a mobile unit with its own 480-volt generator to work on site at military and other government sites.

"A lot of people build precision stuff; we destroy it," Steve Chafitz said.

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 Arleen Chafitz is owner and CEO of e-end company and her husband, Steve, is president. E-End recently moved into the new building at 7118 Geoffrey Way in Frederick, which was outfitted to meet its strict security demands. The company specializes in destruction of information and equipment, and is certified to work with the Department of Defense, Secret Service, Homeland Security, and other agencies, embassies and government contractors. 


Staff photo by Bill Green