Drowning In Garbage

Here's an excerpt from the Washington Post article...

DROWNING IN GARBAGE.png

The world produces more than 3.5 million tons of garbage a day — and that figure is growing.

Story, photos and videos by Kadir van Lohuizen | Noor
Nov. 21, 2017

Since early 2016, I have traveled to six major cities around the world (Jakarta, Tokyo, Lagos, New York, Sao Paulo and Amsterdam) to investigate how they manage — or mismanage — their waste. There are some remarkable differences. And a question emerges: Is this just garbage, or is it a resource?

The world generates at least 3.5 million tons of solid waste a day, 10 times the amount a century ago, according to World Bank researchers. If nothing is done, that figure will grow to 11 million tons by the end of the century, the researchers estimate. On average, Americans throw away their own body weight in trash every month. In Japan, meanwhile, the typical person produces only two-thirds as much. It’s difficult to find comparable figures for the trash produced by mega-cities. But clearly, New York generates by far the most waste of the cities I visited: People in the broader metropolitan area throw away 33 million tons per year, according to a report by a global group of academics published in 2015 in the journal of the National Academy of Sciences. That’s 15 times the Lagos metropolitan area, their study found.

With a sharp increase in the world population and many economies growing, we are producing more waste than ever. In Europe and the United States our trash is largely invisible once it’s tossed; in other parts of the world it is more obvious, in the form of waste dumps, sometimes in the middle of cities.

Dumps are a problem because they release methane, a potent greenhouse gas that traps heat in the atmosphere. Burning trash outdoors is also harmful, to the environment and people’s health.

Landfills and waste dumps are quickly filling up — with many of the largest receiving on average 10,000 tons of waste per day.

As a country becomes richer, the composition of its waste changes — more packaging, electronic components, broken toys and appliances, and relatively less organic material.

New York and San Francisco now have a goal of “zero waste” to be achieved by a reduction in trash and more recycling, but they still have a long way to go. In New York, plastic shopping bags are still provided in almost every store. The world produces over 300 million tons of plastic each year, of which only a small fraction is recycled.

banter gebang.PNG
 

Choose e-End for your electronics recycling

When it comes to end-of-life equipment, e-End strictly adheres to internationally recognized Responsible Recycling (R2) standard to reduce electronics waste and preserve natural resources. We also strive to exceed the EPA’s standards for solid waste recycling and adhere to a zero-landfill policyfor e-waste.

If it plugs into a wall, uses batteries, or looks like it could have done either at one time, we can most likely recycle it!

Complete details about our electronic recycling process

e-End gives everyone the opportunity to empty their storage rooms of unused electronics and have them 100% recycled.

Need ITAD assistance? Contact us to learn how we can assist with your ITAD requirements. We will purchase various IT assets.

See the complete list of the items we accept